Time Out (Structured Time Out)

Time Out (Structured Time Out)

Why should I do it:

  • Quick and easy way to deal with behavior problems and disruptions
  • Time outs are an effective method to address behaviors
  • Increases instructional time and decreases time spent dealing with student behaviors
  • Increases structure for student
  • Provides student with a consistent and predictable consequence that is structured and always the same procedure
  • Easy to set up and implement
  • Can be carried over in the home

When should I do it:

  • When a student exhibits frequent behavior problems and disruptions
  • When a student does not respond to other consequences
  • When a consequence needs to be consistent between the school and home
  • When card flips alone do not seem adequate to address the student’s behaviors
  • When a student has a hard time calming down or settling in a timely manner
  • When a student likes the negative attention they receive from card flips or other disciplinary measures that occur in front of the class

How do I do it:

  • In-Class Time Out:
    • Choose a specific spot in the classroom and always use that same spot
    • Put a chair or desk in the spot
    • Provide some kind of timer or way to measure the time in time out
    • Have the student practice taking a time out before implementing the strategy
    • Provide rules for taking a time out, like no talking, bothering others, standing, making noises, what happens if they cannot appropriately complete a time out, etc
    • Explain to the student what they will receive a time out for
    • You may have students complete a think sheet while in time out, require them to sit quietly, put their head down, etc
    • Consider using a testing corral to minimize distractions and disruptions
    • Keep a log of timeouts for data tracking and analysis
  • Out Of Class Time Out:
    • Choose a specific spot outside of the classroom and always use that same spot, for example, a seat in the office or near the classroom doorway
    • Put a chair or desk in the spot
    • Provide some kind of timer or way to measure the time in time out
    • Have the student practice taking a time out before implementing the strategy
    • Provide rules for taking a time out, like no talking, bothering others, standing, making noises, what happens if they cannot appropriately complete a time out, etc
    • Explain to the student what they will receive a time out for
    • You may have students complete a think sheet while in time out, require them to sit quietly, put their head down, etc
    • Consider using a testing corral to minimize distractions and disruptions
    • Keep a log of timeouts for data tracking and analysis
  • In-class and out of class time outs may be utilized as a progressive discipline system, where the student first receives an in-class time out for a brief period, then on the next offense, they receive a longer out of class time out

Resources:

>>Data Tracking Forms and Strategies
>>I've Tried Teir III For At Least 
      6 weeks & Need More Support